You can’t take the San Antonio Street bridge out of the equation of downtown New Braunfels without causing problems.

To their credit, the Texas Department of Transportation and the city of New Braunfels aren’t wasting time trying to sugarcoat that fact.

When the historic bridge closes in early September, navigating the city’s core will become more of a — let’s be honest here — pain.

Instead the city setup an online home for information about the project (www.nbtexas.org/2347/San-Antonio-St-Bridge) and have worked hand in hand with the media to try and alleviate the biggest concerns and tackle misunderstandings and misinformation.

The portion of the Comal River near the bridge will be closed to recreation, but the rest of the river will remain open. Including the tube chute. 

The hope is, if Mother Nature cooperates, that the entire river will be open by next Memorial Day weekend while work continues above on the bridge.

There will have to be detours around the construction for drivers, which means more traffic winding through the Hinman Island area. Golfers and pedestrians in the area would like to remind you that the speed limit through that stretch is 20 mph, not 30 mph if you don’t see a police officer.

The city will hopefully step up traffic enforcement along the detour routes, but particularly the one through the park.

The bridge work is badly needed for both vehicle and pedestrian safety and is long overdue. It will be uncomfortable, but in the end New Braunfels, and downtown, will be better because of this project.

 

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