Comal County Courthouse

Comal County Courthouse

MIKALA COMPTON | Herald-Zeitung

Comal County’s COVID-19 active case count fell by three on Thursday morning, with that reduction driven by three new reported deaths while the number of new cases and recoveries balanced at 51.

County health officials reported the deaths of a Bulverde man in his 60s on Sept. 22 at a San Antonio hospital, a New Braunfels woman in her 60s on Sept. 27 at a New Braunfels hospital and a New Braunfels man in his 70s on Oct. 5 at a New Braunfels hospital.

Since the pandemic arrived locally in March of 2020, there have been 434 deaths reported. Of those, 112 have come since early June when the latest surge fueled by the delta variant of the coronavirus began.

The county now has 796 cases of COVID-19 with 15 of those patients hospitalized, down 14 patients from Wednesday’s report. Comal County hospitals reported caring for 34 COVID-19 patients with 10 in intensive care and nine on ventilators. Officials say approximately 84% of those hospitalized patients are unvaccinated.

The percentage of hospital beds being used by COVID-19 patients in the 22-county region that includes both Comal and Guadalupe counties has slipped below 10% to 9.32% on Thursday and both of the county’s seven-day positivity rates also fell with the molecular test returning 6.84% positive and the antigen test returning 7.10%.

County health officials have urged people to get vaccinated against the virus because it offers the best protection against hospitalization and death, and are continuing to offer Moderna shots to those over 18 and Pfizer shots to those over the age of 12. Appointments can be made at 830-221-1150. Those who are immunocompromised can also get a third booster shot.

Comal County was leading the statewide percentage of vaccinated patients for much of the year, but as the summer has progressed has fallen behind. Texas has 72.29% of eligible patients with at least one shot, while Comal has 71.44%. Neighboring Guadalupe County, which contains a portion of the city of New Braunfels, trails at 64.60%

For full vaccination, Comal has 63.11% of eligible patients — ahead of the state average of 62.41 — while Guadalupe lags with 57.22%

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(3) comments

Gary Meszaros

Why not start posting how many people die from heart disease and cancer or other causes of death. This constant death toll for Covid is just getting ridiculous. What's the percentage of dearth's compared to people who got it?

Jim Sohan

I feel sorry for you that you can’t understand what makes COVID-19 deaths different. Every death, regardless of the cause, is tragic. I’m sure ever physician out there would like their patients to live healthy lives and reduce the annual number of deaths caused by heart disease, cancer, and other diseases. Wouldn’t it be great if we could eliminate drunk drivers? Many chronic illnesses develop overtime. Yes, some are sudden, but most heart disease typically develops over one's lifetime, often later in life. COVID-19 is sudden. It’s an illness that is fairly easily prevented through vaccines and other preventive measures. Bottom line, 700,000-plus needless, earlier deaths have resulted from our failure to take COVID-19 seriously. Those 700,000-plus unnecessary deaths are a tragedy because most of those 700,000 would be alive today, if we and they had all taken the necessary steps to reduce transmission.

Chris Lykins Staff
Chris Lykins

Remember the old Sesame Street bit, "One of these things is not like the other, one of these things doesn't belong"? Heart disease and cancer aren't contagious.

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